Dr.rogena Emily Adhiambo


Dr.rogena Emily Adhiambo

Academic Qualifications:

Master of Forensic Medicine (MFM), University of Dundee, Scotland, 1999
Master of Medicine in Human Pathology (Mmed Pathology), University of Nairobi, 1996
Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MB ChB), University of Nairobi, 1989;

Interests :

Professional Specialty of Interest are; 1.Forensic Medicine and Toxicology; 2.Histopathology; 3.Cytopathology; 4.Immunohistochemistry; 5.Systemic pathology and Physiology.

Curriculum Vitae:

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Publications (7 Records)

  • A review of the trends in lymphomas: from north to south of the equator Emily A. Rogena1,2, Giulia De Falco1 and Lorenzo Leoncini1* Key words: Lymphomas, infectious agents, developing countries Correspondence should be addressed to: Lorenzo Leoncini, MD Dept of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Siena Via delle Scotte, 6 – 53100- Siena (Italy) Phone: +39-0577-233237 Fax: +39-0577-233235 e-mail: leoncinil@unisi.it - 2010

    Abstract

     

    Recent estimates show that for the next half century, the 11 million cancers diagnosed in 2002 will reach approximately 17 million in 2020 and 27 million in 2050. Close to two thirds of these cancers, 36% of which are related to infectious diseases, will occur in the low-income countries. Although accurate estimates are difficult, given the paucity of information, it is likely that approximately 30,000 non-Hodgkin lymphomas occur in the equatorial belt of Africa each year and these tumours are in among the top-ten causes of cancer in this geographical region. The fraction associated with AIDS is not available, but may be as high as 50%. A much lower cure rate in Africa suggests that the difference in mortality will even be more pronounced in future, paediatric oncology being the most dramatic example, as a striking gap in terms of survival rate, in respect with developed countries, is still observed.

    Literature still shows a wide difference in terms of early detection, diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas between the developed and developing countries. Of note, the disease burden appears to be increasing in the developing countries. A much lower cure rate in the low income countries suggests that the difference in mortality will even become more pronounced in future. Improving diagnosis is crucial as without it, neither meaningful research projects nor effective patient management can be instituted. 

    In this review, we will summarize the state-of-the-art of lymphoma epidemiology, pathobiology and therapy, and will highlight the still existing gaps between developed and developing countries.

  • Burkitt , versus diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a practical approach Bellan C, Lazzi S, Defalco G, Rogena EA, Leoncini L. - 2009

    Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) is listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lymphoid tumours as an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, characterized by a high degree of proliferation of the malignant cells and deregulation of the c-MYC gene. The main diagnostic challenge in BL is to distinguish it from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). While in children BL and DLBCL types probably do not differ clinically, and the differential diagnosis between BL and DLBCL may theoretically appear clear-cut, in adults daily practice shows the existence of cases that have morphological features, immunophenotypic and cytogenetics intermediate between DLBCL and BL, and cannot be classified with certainty in these categories. Distinguishing between BL and DLBCL is critical, as the two diseases require different management. This review summarizes the current practical approach, including the use of a large panel of antibodies, and cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic techniques, to distinguish between BL, DLBCL and the provisional category of B-cell lymphoma, unclassificable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma, now listed in the updated WHO classification.

  • Pattern of road traffic fatalities in Nairobi M.P Okemwa, E.A Rogena, F Rana, D.G Gatei - 2008

    Background: Road traffic injuries continue to exert a huge burden on Kenya’s healthcare services. Over 134,000 crashes occur on the Kenyan roads killing more than 2,600 and seriously injuring 11,000 people annually. Injury pattern among traffic trauma admissions have been recently described while that of fatalities remains unstudied. Serious injuries will continue to result from road collisions as long as the compliance to traffic rules remains poor, the rates of seat belt use is low and the number of pedestrian walkways and flyovers few. Objective: To determine the pattern of fatal injuries from road traffic collisions in the city of Nairobi. Design: This was a prospective descriptive study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and the Nairobi City Mortuary. Subjects: One hundred consecutive road traffic fatalities autopsied between April 2003
    and January 2004 (90 KNH Mausoleum, 10 Nairobi City Mortuary). Results: Casualties included 81 males and 19 females with an age range of 4-80 years and a median age of 33.5 years. Forty-five percent arrived at casualty dead while the remainder were admitted for a mean period of 14 days. The main road-user groups involved were pedestrians (62%), passengers (24%) and drivers (9%). A majority (72%) were injuries sustained along major highways. Head trauma was the most common form of injury accounting for 76%, followed by chest injuries 70%, abdominal injuries 60%, lower limb injuries 56%, upper limb injuries 35%, neck injuries 29% and pelvic injuries 24%. Head, abdominal and chest injuries accounted for 57%, 17% and 13% of causes of death respectively. Limb injury was the least common cause of mortality, although it may have complicated some of the other injuries. Conclusion: Road traffic fatalities are predominantly a pedestrian problem. Head and trunk injuries account for 87% of the deaths. Provision of pedestrian walkways and flyovers along major highways may protect the vulnerable pedestrian population. Improvement of immediate emergency services able to cope with head and trunk injuries is recommended.

    Annals of African Surgery 3 (2008)

  • Non-penetrating chest blows and sudden death in the young. Thakore S, Johnston M, Rogena E, Peng Z, Sadler D. Accident and Emergency Department, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Scotland. - 2000

    Sudden death in the young after low energy anterior chest wall impact is an under-recognised phenomenon in this country. Review of the literature yields several American references to commotio cordis, mainly in the context of sporting events. Two cases are reported of sudden death in young men as a result of blunt impact anterior chest wall trauma. It is suggested that these cases draw attention to a lethal condition of which many practitioners are unaware.

    J Accid Emerg Med 2000 Nov 17 (6): 421-422. PMID: 11104247 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC1725482

     

  • J Accid Emerg Med. 2000 Nov;17(6):421-2. Non-penetrating chest blows and sudden death in the young.Thakore S, Johnston M, Rogena E, Peng Z, Sadler D. - 2000

    Sudden death in the young after low energy anterior chest wall impact is an under-recognised phenomenon in this country. Review of the literature yields several American references to commotio cordis, mainly in the context of sporting events. Two cases are reported of sudden death in young men as a result of blunt impact anterior chest wall trauma. It is suggested that these cases draw attention to a lethal condition of which many practitioners are unaware.

       J Accid Emerg Med. 2000 Nov;17(6):421-2.

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